Upper Midwest Lacrosse Officials Association

Upper Midwest Lacrosse Officials

 

Questions

All questions are for NFHS rules unless otherwise noted. Because Minnesota Youth Rules are based on NFHS rules, most situations apply to youth games as well.

 

1. Friday, May 15, 2015:

Players A1 and B1 are serving penalties, and Team A has possession in its offensive end. Team A has 5 players in the offensive end and 3 players (including the goalie) in its defensive end. Team B has 6 players (including the goalie) in its defensive end and 2 players  in its offensive end. See diagram.  What is the proper ruling?

 

2. Saturday, May 16, 2015

A1 has possession and is slashed by B1, flag down. Then A1 is held by B1, flag down. A1 shoots, and the ball goes out of bounds. The penalties are reported, and Team B has 4 players plus a goalie on its defensive end and 3 players on its offensive end. The Team B head coach immediately tries to get clarification from the reporting official on whether he will be down one man or two men, and—while this is happening—the far-side official starts play and a goal is scored.  What is the proper ruling?

 

3. Sunday, May 17, 2015

Team A is awarded possession in a quick restart situation (e.g., out of bounds ball, change-of-possession technical foul), and A1 is standing outside of the attack area on his offensive end of the field. What is the proper procedure in the following cases?

  1. A1 picks up the ball, and B1 is standing closer than 5 yards away from A1.
  2. A1 picks up the ball, and A2 is standing closer than 5 yards away from A1.
  3. A1 picks up the ball but does not have his mouth guard in.
  4. A1 picks up the ball. B1 is farther than 5 yards from A1 when possession is awarded, but B1 runs in to a position closer than 5 yards from A1.
  5. No one from Team A makes any attempt to get to the ball and pick it up.

 

4. Monday, May 18, 2015

Team A scores and a face-off is pending between A1 and B1.

  1. Team B delays the game prior to the face-off.
  2. B1 takes an illegal face-off position (but A1 is legal).
  3. B1 moves after “set” but before the whistle.
  4. The face-off begins, and the ball rolls toward Team A’s goal. There is a play-on for a loose-ball push by B1. Play stops in Team A’s defensive end without the ball having crossed the restraining line.

In each case, where is the restart, which official has the restart, and what else do you need to be aware of?

 

5. Tuesday, May 19, 2015

There is a shot, which hits the pipe but does not enter the goal. The ball is loose in the attack area but outside the crease when there is an inadvertent whistle by one of the officials. The officials award the ball to Team A in the alley with a quick restart, and Team A scores immediately (with no stoppages of play before the goal). Coach B calls for a Rule 7-13 conference and states that Team B had alternate possession and that the restart was improper. The officials confirm that Team B did have alternate possession. What is the proper ruling?

 

6. Wednesday, May 20, 2015

A1 has possession in the attack area when the official notices that

  1. B1's chin strap is unbuckled.
  2. B1's shoe has come off.
  3. B1's arm pad has fallen off.
  4. B1 has lost a glove.

B1 is not the goalie. In each case, what is the correct procedure?

 

7. Thursday, May 21, 2015

U13 or higher-level game. Team A leads by 1 goal with under 2 minutes left in the fourth quarter, and B1 is trying to clear the ball. Just before B1 gets to midfield, he drops the ball and A1 picks it up. B1 slashes A1. A1 enters the attack area, takes the ball behind the goal, and is trying to run around behind the goal to kill time, where he is slashed by B2. Describe all of the officials responsibilities in this sequence. 

 

8. Friday, May 22, 2015

The ball goes out of bounds and is last touched by a white team player. The official points in the direction the red team is attacking but yells “White ball!” The white team clearly reacts to the call of “white ball”: midfielders run to the other end of the field to play offense and the white defenders and goalie set up their clear. A red-team player picks up the ball, the official blows the whistle, and the red team player runs in and scores against essentially no defense. How should this be handled?

NOTE: Question of the Day will be on hiatus for Memorial Day weekend and will return Tuesday, May 26.

 

9. Tuesday, May 26, 2015

During a loose ball, A1 and B1 are within 5 yards of a loose ball. B1 is holding his crosse in his left hand, with his right hand not touching his stick. Then:

  1. B1 holds his right arm out, against A1’s chest, to prevent A1 from getting to the ball.
  2. B1 pushes A1 from the front, in the chest, using his right hand.
  3. B1 body checks A1 from the front or side, knocking him to the ground.
  4. B1 scoops the ball with his left hand, then uses his right hand to push A1’s crosse away as A1 tries to check B1’s crosse.

What is the correct call in each case?

 

10. Wednesday, May 27, 2015

What is the count, and whose count is it, in each of the following face-off situations? 

  1. A1 gains possession in his offensive end, then retreats to his defensive end.
  2. A1 gains possession in his defensive end.
  3. B1 commits a pre-possession face-off violation.
  4. B1 commits a loose-ball push in Team A's defensive end before the face-off is over.
  5. The ball rolls loose into Team A’s attack area (officials yell “Play!”), then rolls back into Zone 3 (midfield area or alley), where A1 picks it up.

Answers differ for two-person and three-person mechanics.

 

11. Thursday, May 28, 2015

Player A1 has possession in his attack area and then A1:  

  1. Passes to A2, who is in the midfield area but in the offensive end of the field, and the ball goes over A2's head into the defensive end of the field, where it is picked up by A3.
  2. Intentionally passes to A3 in the defensive end of the field.
  3. Passes to A2, who intentionally carries the ball back to the defensive end.
  4. Passes to A2, who is legally pushed into his defensive end.
  5. Passes to A2, who is illegally pushed into his defensive end. 

 What is the proper enforcement in each case?

 

12. Friday, May 29, 2015

A1 has possession, and B1 slashes him in the head or neck. What are your options for penalties?

 

13. Sunday, May 31, 2015

You arrive at the game site and discover that the home team has:

  1. No cones or pylons on the sidelines.
  2. Seven soft, flexible cones or pylons on the sidelines.
  3. Seven soft, flexible "soccer discs" on the sidelines
  4. Ten soft, flexible cones or pylons on the sidelines.
  5. Seven hard plastic cones on the sidelines.
  6. Soccer flags on the corners of the field and soft, plastic cones or pylons at the other locations.

What is the proper action in each case?

 

14. Monday, June 1, 2015

For a U15 game played under Minnesota youth rules or US Lacrosse youth rules, what are the possible penalties for the following? A1 has possession.

  1. B1 lowers his shoulder, runs at A1, and hits A1 in the chest with enough force to put A1 on the ground.
  2. B1 runs at A1 and delivers a forearm to A1's helmet with enough force to knock A1 to the ground.
  3. B1 lowers his shoulder, runs at A1, and hits A1 in the back with enough force to put A1 on the ground. A1 is unable to see B1 approaching.
  4. B1 commits any act deemed unnecessary roughness.

 

15. Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Team A  has possession in the offensive end in a U13 or higher game and is issued a get-it-in/keep-it-in stall warning.

  1. If the ball hits the pipe and then goes out of bounds on a shot, what is the proper ruling/mechanic?
  2. If the ball goes out of the attack area after last being touched by the defense, what is the proper ruling/mechanic?
  3. What ends the stall warning?

 

16. Wednesday, June 3, 2015

A1 has possession in front of the goal and 5 yards above the GLE, and B1 is guarding him. B1 has both hands on the stick and his hands are 12 inches apart, with his left hand covering the butt end of his stick. B1's stick does not contact A1 unless otherwise noted, and in no cases is the contact violent.

  1. B1 has both hands in contact with A1's chest and uses equal pressure to keep A1 from advancing to the goal.
  2. B1 has both hands in contact with A1's  back and uses equal pressure to keep A1 from advancing to the goal.
  3. B1 has his left hand  in contact with A1's chest and pushes A1, driving A1 away from the goal.
  4. B1 has his left hand  in contact with A1's back and pushes A1, driving A1 away from the goal.
  5. B1 makes contact with the portion of the stick between his hands against A1's side to keep A1 from advancing to the goal.
  6. B1 makes contact with the portion of the stick between his hands against A1's side and pushes A1 away from the goal.

What is the proper ruling in each case?

 

17. Thursday, June 4, 2015

A1 has possession and A2 and B2 make contact away from the ball and begin roughly pushing and shoving each other away from the ball. Neither player is doing anything significantly worse than the other, and it does not seem appropriate to assign more blame to either player. What are your options for handling this, and what is generally the best option?

 

18. Friday, June 5, 2015

A1 has possession in the attack area and is closely guarded by B1. There is a Team A change-of-possession technical foul (e.g., warding, illegal screen), and then A1:

  1. Shoots the ball at the goal more or less simultaneously with the whistle.
  2. Shoots the ball at the goal well after the whistle.
  3. Throws the ball out of bounds well after the whistle.
  4. Places the ball directly on the ground after the official calls the foul, then backs up 5 yards.
  5. Dumps the ball onto the ground after the official calls the foul, causing it to roll 3 yards away.
  6. Rolls the ball 10 yards away after the official calls the foul, causing the clearing team to have to chase after the ball.

What is the proper ruling in each case?

 

19. Monday, June 8, 2015

Today's question is about contact in youth games. What is the reasonable penalty options for each of the following situations? In each case, A1 has possession. Give answers for both U15 and U11.

  1. B1 intentionally lowers his shoulder and hits A1 in the chest, knocking A1 to the ground.
  2. B1  hits A1 in the front of the head with his forearm or gloved hands on the stick, knocking A1 to the ground.
  3. B1  hits A1 in the back of the head or neck with his forearm, knocking A1 to the ground. A1 does not see the hit coming,
  4. B1 runs in and intentionally cross-checks A1 in the head.

 

 

Answers

1. Friday, May 15, 2015:

Neither team is offside. Offside has been redefined so that it is now having too many players in one end of the field—more than 7 on the defensive end or more than 6 on the offensive end, with players serving penalties counting toward both ends. Here, Team A has 5 players on the offensive end and one serving a penalty, so it does not have too many.  Similarly, Team B has 6 on its defensive end plus one serving a penalty, so it does not have too many. See NFHS Rule 4-10 (p. 39 in the 2015 rulebook). The important mechanic for officials is to count forward.

However, the total number of players on the field and serving penalties is 9 and not 10. If this situation persists for more than a few seconds while a team is subbing, the officials should use a silent play-on and wait to see if an unfair advantage is gained when the players finally do come onto the field (NFHS 4.21 Situation, p. 48 in the 2015 rule book)

 

2. Saturday, May 16, 2015

This is a mechanics question as much as a rules question. First, the Trail needs to make sure both partners know what the penalty situation will be so the other officials can make sure the goalie knows and so they can get the field ready. 

After reporting the two penalties on B1, the Trail official should have summarized by saying, "Team B will be down one man for 1:30" and then started the 20-second timer. At that point, teams have 20 seconds to sub, and if either team has too many or too few players on the field when the timer goes off, it is a delay of game foul (loss of possession if by Team A or another 30-second penalty on Team B).

Here, the restart was improper. Either the 20-second timer hadn't sounded yet, in which case play should not have been started because Team B was short one player, or it did sound while Team B had too few players on the field and there should have been a flag for delay of game. In any case, if there is no point from the Trail indicating that he or she is ready for the restart, the other official or officials should not be starting play in this situation. 

Net result: you have to wipe out the goal due to an official's error, put time back on the clock (for a stop-time game) and restart play with the correct number of players on the field. This is not going to sit well with the Team A coach, so it's far better to get the mechanics right the first time.

 

3. Sunday, May 17, 2015

The key in most of these situations is that we cannot restart play if there is any player within 5 yards of the player in possession. This is different from the college rule, which causes some confusion among coaches, players, and officials. This may keep us from getting the restart as quick as we would like, but we have to make sure the player has the 5 yards. Here is how to enforce this:

  1. Start a visual 5-count and repeatedly tell B1 “Give him 5 yards…back up!” If your count gets to 5, flag B1 for delay of game. However, if A1 moves forward to prevent B1 from gaining the 5 yards, stop your count and move A1 back where he is supposed to be.
  2. Start a visual 5-count and repeatedly tell A1 “Give him 5 yards…back up!” If your count gets to 5, turn the ball over to Team B.
  3. Start a visual 5-count and repeatedly tell A1 “Get your mouth guard in!” If your count gets to 5, turn the ball over to Team B. (Note how much better this is than restarting play and then flagging A1 for a mouth guard violation!)
  4.  Flag B1 for delay of game (per NFHS Rule 6-5-2-i). There’s no 5-count in this case.
  5.  Start a 5-second count while telling them “[Color], pick up the ball.” If they don’t get the ball in 5-seconds, it’s a turnover (although if they are doing their best to get their quickly, it might be a “longer” 5 seconds, and we don’t penalize them for having to go find a ball if the ball went out of bounds). See NFHS Rule 6-5-2-v.

 

4. Monday, May 18, 2015 

In all 4 cases, the ball is awarded to Team A and must be moved into the Team A’s offensive side of the field, just across midfield, before play can start (this ensures that the team in possession starts with a 10-count and not a 20).

In two-person mechanics, the Face-Off official reports the violation, the Lead sprints to cover the goal, and the Trail has the whistle to restart and has the 10-count. Note the depending on which way play is going, this means the Face-Off official may or may not have the whistle.

In three-person mechanics, Lead has the goal, Single takes the whistle to restart and has the 10-count, and Trail has subs.

In all 4 cases, players behind the restraining line are not released until the whistle. 

 

5. Tuesday, May 19, 2015

The officials should admit the error, disallow the goal, and put an appropriate amount of time back on the clock. Errors are correctable until the next live ball following the error. In this case, the error was restarting play with the wrong team in possession, so the error is correctable as long as play did not restart after the goal.

This is a case where slowing down to make sure you get the right restart is much better than getting a quick but incorrect restart. You will have an upset coach when you disallow the goal. Explain to the coach that his or her team only had the ball because of your error and that you will provide the same consideration to either team when there is such an error.

 

6. Wednesday, May 20, 2015

In all 4 cases, officials should stop play immediately if B1 is in a scrimmage area, allow B1 to fix the problem, and then restart with Team A in possession outside the attack area. If B1 is not in a scrimmage area, allow play to continue until the "play is completed" (generally taken to mean there is no imminent scoring opportunity)  or until B1 is in a scrimmage area. The safety of the players is key, and play cannot be allowed to continue if players who are not properly equipped are in a scrimmage area.

Under NFHS rules, there is no penalty for participating without equipment if the equipment situation occurs as a result of play (obviously, entering the game without required equipment or intentionally losing required equipment is a different situation) as there would be under NCAA rules. Similarly, there is no telling the player to fix it during a live ball: stop play and make sure B1 is properly equipped before restarting.

 

7. Thursday, May 21, 2015

Because Team A is in the lead and there is less than 2 minutes remaining, when they gain possession in their offensive the officials should yell "Get it in!" and give the "Get it in!" hand signal, with the horizontal arm pointing in the direction Team A is attacking. Trail should start a 10-count. There should be a flag thrown for the slash and all officials should yell "Flag down!" the 10-count continues (it does not reset for a flag as it does for a play-on).

As soon as A1 steps into the attack area, the officials should yell "Keep it in!" and give the "Keep it in!" hand signal. Trail should move to the corner of the box to have a proper view of the top and side of the attack area and will stop play and call/signal "Stalling!" (not "delay of game") if needed.

When the second flag is thrown in this end-of-game situation, officials have to stop play unless there is an imminent scoring opportunity. With A1 trying to kill time, there is no scoring opportunity and the officials must stop play.  

Trail reports the penalties, making clear that Team B will be down two men for 1 minute. Trail has the 20-second timer.  Lead gets the field ready for the restart—moving the ball to the alley—makes sure the goalie knows where the ball is and what the penalty situation is, makes sure Team A players knows they have 10 to get it in and then the have to keep it in, and then Lead restarts when the field is set (count players!) and the other officials are ready.

 

8. Friday, May 22, 2015

This is an officials' error. Any time there is conflicting or incorrect information given by the officials that could affect the play of the game, the officials should not restart play (or quickly stop play if it has been restarted) and make sure everyone has the correct information. Slow down the restart and make sure everyone knows which way play is going and has time to set up. If teams have substituted in anticipation of needing offensive or defensive midfielders on the field, given the teams time to sub on the correct personnel (in this situation, use your 20-second timer after making sure both teams know all of the correct information).

In this scenario, the official’s error led directly to a goal. Disallow the goal, put time back on the clock if necessary, and restart with red in possession. Be sure the white defense has had time to set up and that the white team goalie knows where the ball will be restarting.

Note that the same reasoning would apply if the official said the correct color but pointed the wrong direction: if the point is not immediately corrected and players react to it, slow down the restart to make sure everyone knows which way you are going.

Mechanics tip: Don't be in a hurry to make your call. Officials often feel like they need to make the call asfastaspossible! You have time. Realize that no one is expecting a call until you are done blowing the whistle. If you need time, keep the single blast of your whistle going while you are giving the dead-ball signal, figure out which color should be awarded possession, look at the goalie so you know which way you are going, and then stop blowing the whistle, crisply point in the direction of play, and yell "[Color] ball!" No one is going to notice that you blew the whistle for 3 seconds instead of 1.5 seconds.

 

9. Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Though people often call it—and some people have even made up a signal for it—there is no such foul in the rules of lacrosse as “playing with the free hand.” This question covers the main cases:

  1. Hold
  2. Push
  3. Illegal body check
  4. Ward

If it involves the free hand, it is always one of these four cases. That being said, when reporting, it does make sense to be explicit about what was illegal about it. For example, giving the “hold” or “push” signal while saying “free hand” quickly makes it clear to everyone not only what the general foul was (since everyone knows those two signals) but also what specifically about the play you saw that made it illegal.    

 

10. Wednesday, May 27, 2015

For two-person mechanics:

  1. Lead has 10-count, unless Lead doesn't realize A1 was in the offensive end and Trail does.
  2. Trail has 20-timer (freshman and higher-level; no 20-timer in youth).
  3. Ball starts in offensive end; Trail has whistle and 10-count.
  4. Ball starts in offensive end; Trail has whistle and 10-count.
  5. The 10-count starts on possession. Neither team can satisfy a 10-count until it is determined which team has possession. Trail has the count unless the ball is in the Lead's alley.

For three-person mechanics:

  1. Single has 10-count.
  2. Single has 20-timer.
  3. Ball starts in offensive end; Single has whistle and 10-count.
  4. Ball starts in offensive end; Single has whistle and 10-count.
  5. The 10-count starts on possession. Neither team can satisfy a 10-count until it is determined which team has possession. Single has the count unless the ball is in the Lead's alley.

 

11. Thursday, May 28, 2015

The rulings are:

  1. Because the ball was unintentionally passed back, there is no stall warning. Start a 20-timer when A3 gains possession (for freshman and higher level games) and then a 10-count when the ball comes across midfield (for U13 and higher).
  2. Because the pass was intentional, for U13 and higher games, give the "Get it in!" warning as soon as possession is established regardless of where the ball is picked up.

For carrying the ball back to the defensive end, it doesn't matter whether it is intentional or unintentional, so in 3, 4, and 5 there will be a "Get it in!" warning followed by "Keep it in!" In 5, there is a flag down for the illegal push, but Team A still has to get the ball in and keep it in.

 

12. Friday, May 29, 2015

A slash to the head or neck can still be a 1:00, 2:00, or 3:00 releasable penalty unless it is "excessive, violent, or uncontrolled," at which point it must be a 2:00 NR, a 3:00 NR penalty, or an ejection. There are some people insisting that any slash to the head must be at least a 2:00 NR penalty, and that is wrong. [Editor's note: I have a hard time picturing something that would be a 2:00 or 3:00 releasable slash to the head, because if it is bad enough to warrant the extra penalty time it is probably excessive, violent, or uncontrolled, but that doesn't mean it could never happen.]

 

13. Sunday, May 31, 2015

The proper actions are:

  1. As early as possible, ask the home team to supply soft, flexible cones or pylons (but there is no penalty if they cannot; report it to the assigner or league).
  2. Legal.
  3. Legal.
  4. Remove the extra cones or pylons.
  5. Hard plastic cones are a safety issue and must be removed. If possible, replace them with soft, flexible cones or pylons. If not possible, remove the hard plastic cones and play without them 
  6. Same as 5: have the home team remove the soccer flags and replace them if possible.

 

14. Monday, June 1, 2015

The minimum penalties are different under youth rules than NFHS rules in many cases.

  1. This is a take-out check. By rule, the minimum penalty is 2:00 NR; it could be more for severe hits.
  2. This is an illegal body check with contact to the head, which would be a minimum 2:00 NR penalty at the HS level, and if B1 hadn't made head contact it would have been a 2:00 NR minimum as a take-out check. Because of that, this should be a 3:00 NR penalty or an ejection at the youth level.
  3. This is an illegal body check from behind (which is a 1:00 releasable minimum at the HS level) but also against a defenseless player (which would be a minimum 2:00 NR penalty at the HS level). If B1 had body checked A1 from the front, it would have been a 2:00 NR minimum as a take-out check. Because of that, this should be a 3:00 NR penalty or an ejection at the youth level.
  4. Under youth rules, unnecessary roughness is a 1:00 NR, 2:00 NR, or 3:00 NR penalty. In youth games, unnecessary roughness is always NR, whereas in HS games it is always releasable unless there are circumstances that make it NR (e.g., penalties starting at the same time; see Rule 7-2).

 

15. Tuesday, June 2, 2015

The rulings and mechanics are: 

  1. Award possession as usual. If Team A is awarded possession, the stall warning is still on. If the restart is in the attack area, tell Team A they still have to keep it in, restart play, and give the "keep it in!" warning again. If the restart is outside the attack area, tell Team A they will have 10 seconds to get it in and then will have to keep it in, restart play, and give the "get it in!" warning again. Trail should move to the corner of the goal area once the ball is in.
  2. Signal tipped ball and yell "[Color of Team B] tip!"; this indicates to everyone that either team can recover. If Team A recovers the ball outside of the attack area, renew the "get it in!" and "keep it in!"
  3. Only three things end a stall warning in youth and NFHS lacrosse: (1) a goal is scored  (2) A period ends, resulting in a face-off (but if possession carries over, the stall warning carries over with it  (3) The defense gains possession (note that intercepting a pass to end a flag down does not count as the defense gaining possession for the purposes of ending a stall warning).

 

16. Wednesday, June 3, 2015

The key point here is that B1 is not required to have his hands together, but he cannot use the stick between the hands to push or hold and gain an advantage. Telling players to "get the hands together" is not appropriate, because that's not a requirement; "use the gloves, not the stick" is better.

Also, because the contact is not violent, none of these cases would be called as a cross check; we should be looking to see if an unfair advantage is gained in each case

  1. Legal hold
  2. Legal hold since A1 has possession (would be illegal during a loose ball)
  3. Legal push.
  4. Illegal push from behind, flag down.
  5. Illegal hold, flag down.
  6. Illegal push, flag down.

Note that in 1-3, the stick is not used to hold or push, and the other requirements for a legal hold or push are met. In 5-6, the stick is used to hold or push, which is illegal. Because A1 is right in front of the goal and attempting to shoot, an advantage is gained, so a flag is appropriate.

Edit 6/4/15: Note that we are not saying that all contact with the stick between the hands should result in a flag. If it's violent contact, it's a cross check, and if an advantage is gained it's a flag for a technical hold or push; if it's not violent and there is no advantage gained, it's a no-call (and possibly a warning as explained above).

 

17. Thursday, June 4, 2015

You have several options:

  1. Blow the whistle and call interference on both players. Stop play and separate the players. These are simultaneous technical fouls, so Team A maintains possession.
  2. Throw both flags, blow the whistle, and call unnecessary roughness on both players (say for 1:00 each). These are simultaneous personal fouls, so Team A maintains possession. By Rule 7-2, the common penalty time is non-releasable, so teams will play 5-on-5 for 1:00 NR.
  3. Throw both flags, blow the whistle, and call non-releasable unsportsmanlike conduct on both players (say for 1:00 each). These are simultaneous personal fouls, so Team A maintains possession. Teams will play 5-on-5 for 1:00 NR.

If the pushing and shoving is minor, you can go with option 1, but if it is getting particularly rough then option 2 is usually better than option 3. If you go with option 3 and someone gets another USC later in the game, say for profanity, then you would have to eject the player. The UR penalty achieves the same game management goal—getting the players off the field to cool down without penalizing either team more than the other—without putting the players at risk of ejection. 

There may be situations where you think it is bad enough to go with option 3, but make that a conscious decision and not the default. 

 

18. Friday, June 5, 2015

The key principle is that the team losing possession cannot disadvantage the opposing team by moving the ball a significant distance from where the restart should be. When they do that, it creates a disadvantage because the team called for the foul gets time to set up their defense while the team awarded the ball is chasing down the ball.

  1. No foul. The player did not have time to react to the whistle.
  2. There is no foul for "shooting after the whistle" as in hockey, but in this case a flag for delay of game (30-second technical)  is probably appropriate since the ball is moved from the correct location of the restart. If done violently or with bad intent, a NR unsportsmanlike conduct foul is probably appropriate.
  3. Flag for delay of game (30-second technical).
  4. Correct procedure; no foul.
  5. The player really should place the ball on the ground, but 3 yards is not enough to create a disadvantage. No foul.
  6. Flag for delay of game (30-second technical).

Ultimately, how long after the whistle and how far the ball is rolled or thrown away you need to see before determining that a disadvantage has been created is a judgment call.

Also, note that circumstances can change these rulings. For example, if A1 wards, you blow the whistle, you call the ward, Coach A calls timeout, and then A1 rolls the ball out of bounds, there's no delay of game there because once the timeout is taken it is no longer a quick restart situation.

 

19. Monday,  June 8, 2015

The key rule is that any takeout check is a minimum 2:00 NR penalty in U15 and U13, so the penalties should be escalated for body checks that would be illegal in a high school game.

  1. This is basically the definition of a take-out check, so it would be a 2:00 NR penalty for U15 (or U13) unless it was excessively violent, in which case you might bump it up to 3:00 NR (or even an ejection. For U11, no body checking of any kind is allowed, so the minimum penalty is still 2:00 NR here but you very easily could go to 3:00 NR.
  2. Here, there's violent contact to the head. If there was no head contact, it would have been 2:00 NR at U15, and the violent contact to the head makes it more serious. Penalize with 3:00 NR (or possibly an ejection, especially at U11).
  3. Here you have violent contact to a defenseless player from  behind and to the head. In a youth game, that's almost certainly an ejection. Remember, they aren't even allowed to put a shoulder in the chest and knock someone down at this level.
  4. An intentional cross check to the head is a definite ejection in a youth game, especially when you have a player running in with intent to cross check. 

Remember, these are youth games with very limited contact and no violent contact.